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2020 Ski-Doo's

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On 3/11/2019 at 9:57 AM, Big Pussy said:

How long do those bulbs last ?  I found expensive Silverstar were done in 6 months so I went back to a standard halogen in my car.  I used higher wattage bulbs in my old T-Cat. (3 separate bulbs) They are still burning but I have not rode at night for years.

I have had them in my sled for 6 years. Mind you I do not run them all the time and unless the housing is projector they should never be used for low beams.

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2 hours ago, zoso said:

Putting Xenon bulbs in a reflective housing scatters the light and blinds oncoming sleds. I have them in my sled but have them only for high beams. They are very bright and the light shoots everywhere. if used in the low beams in a reflector housing you will be endangering yourself and others.

 

I have Xenon bulbs in my pickup, I find them significantly better than the stock bulbs. They seem to reflect properly too. I was under the impression that Xenon and halogen lights were the same other than the filament material and the gas .... ?

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1 hour ago, Denis007 said:

 

I have Xenon bulbs in my pickup, I find them significantly better than the stock bulbs. They seem to reflect properly too. I was under the impression that Xenon and halogen lights were the same other than the filament material and the gas .... ?

Of course you like them, it is the poor bastad coming the other way that gets blinded. they are meant to go in projector headlights, not reflector headlights. On low beams they blind people.

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Of all the things we love and hate about our vehicles, one topic is guaranteed to bring strong opinions from almost anyone you ask: headlamps. The views are pretty much divided into two camps: those who wish their vehicles’ headlamps were brighter and those who wish oncoming vehicles had dimmer lamps. The problem for the second group is pretty much found in the first group trying to brighten the lights on their daily rides.

Those looking for brighter lights thought the heavens themselves were shining down the highway when High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps came out in automotive applications in the 1990s. These lamps with their tell-tale bluish-white glare seemed to miraculously cut through the darkest night bringing anything on the road ahead to light. The problem is that these lights are usually only available on higher end vehicles. But that didn’t stem the tide of drivers looking to brighten their view or dazzle their friends with some HID power on their subcompacts or minivans. The automotive aftermarket answered the call and today you can find any number of suppliers with do-it-yourself kits ready to shine your ride. But, there’s almost always a but.

What many people fail to realize is that most headlamps aren’t designed to take the additional light output and heat generated by HID lamps. Today’s headlamps can be sorted into two types; reflective and projector style. The more common reflective lamps are easily recognized by the large mirror-like surface at the back of the lamp. With these lights, the output from the bulb is directed backward into the reflective dish-shaped rear surface where it is focused and redirected forward to illuminate the road ahead. Projector headlamps have tube-shaped glass units inside the lamp with a thick lens at the front (think of the coke-bottle glasses that cataract patients used to wear). In these lamps, the bulbs project their light forward where the lens focuses it into a very clear and sharp pattern with well-defined edges.

Cars that pioneered our favourite luxury features

When most HID conversion kits are installed on reflector style headlamps they simply wash the road ahead in a very broad and glaring pattern that causes great risks to oncoming drivers. One of the largest HID conversion kit retailers in Canada is HID Canada and they are quite clear about why HID conversion kits aren’t the answer for everyone. To quote one of their managing partners, “These (reflector style lamps) are horrible systems based on the fact that unless the light is aimed extremely low (and therefore ineffective), there will always be glare to the driver in front of you and on-coming traffic. This poses a real and direct safety risk to other drivers on the road and we absolutely cannot condone the use of an HID conversion kit in those types of light housings. Fortunately, many aftermarket projector based light housings are available to replace stock reflector types.

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First of all I hate the projector headlights on a behemouth truck shining in my car back window.  I don't modify my road vehicle lights.  It's funny how the plastic car headlight housings are so useless after a few years.  Really crappy light output through the crappy plastic lense.  I have not tried to polish them because I hear they don't last long anyway.  For some reason, the 4 rectangular GLASS halogen sealed beam lamps on my 87 Monte Carlo SS still have the same bright light as when they were new.  That's progress.

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Went to Geisler Marine on saturday and put money down on a new 2020 Black 900 turbo renegade.Going to be a long summer.lol....

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Wooohooo ! !

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On 3/19/2019 at 6:28 PM, zoso said:

Of course you like them, it is the poor bastad coming the other way that gets blinded. they are meant to go in projector headlights, not reflector headlights. On low beams they blind people.

 

Not these. On a wall or garage door they shine identically to the halogen bulbs did.... after adjusting the housings of course....

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Chatter around the 'net about how BRP seems to be pushing their targeted buyers towards the long track/freeride segment. Well I wonder if the selection of their Ambassadors reflects this?

 

Squamish, BC

Valdez, AK

Alpine, WY

Sicamous, BC 

Grand Lake CO

Houghton MI

Labrador City, NL

Preston ID

'Southeast' ID

Revelstoke, BC

Waunakee, WI

 

I'm guessing the 'Ambassadors' from Michigan & Wisconsin are the trail riding experts...

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Ski-doo doesn't give a rat's ass about trail riders. They care about mountain and backcountry riding. They cater to the flatlanders as a courtesy for the most part. Hell, even the utility sleds get more improvements and attention than 137 and under group. 

 

Just try and prove otherwise. 

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They are all on the con wagon, apparently anything under a 137 can't handle the trails anymore and yes it needs at least a 1.75 track. 

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I have to agree with you Dennis. When you look at the sales brochures they start with the mountain segment then near the back the trail sleds are shown. That brochure would be fine for the guys out west but for the flatlanders in Ontario we should have the trail sleds at the front.

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1 hour ago, snowchopper said:

I have to agree with you Dennis. When you look at the sales brochures they start with the mountain segment then near the back the trail sleds are shown. That brochure would be fine for the guys out west but for the flatlanders in Ontario we should have the trail sleds at the front.

Same at the shows, lots of long tracks. I remember not being impressed w/ the sleds on display in Ptbo a few years ago. The Blizzard when it debuted looked like the only 'practical' offering for southern Ontario riders.

 

If the trails are groomed perfectly, what's the point of a 137 & it's ability to bridge moguls?

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I have a 137 and it bridges 12" moguls just fine.  Not so good on the big stuff.  have you noticed the moguls getting longer due to the longer tracks out there ?  Soon need a 10 ft skid to bridge them.

Edited by Big Pussy
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36 minutes ago, Big Pussy said:

I have a 137 and it bridges 12" moguls just fine.  Not so good on the big stuff.  have you noticed the moguls getting longer due to the longer tracks out there ?  Soon need a 10 ft skid to bridge them.

That's where the 164" Summit fits the bill for a Sat' afternoon on the Seguin...

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2 hours ago, revrnd said:

Same at the shows, lots of long tracks. I remember not being impressed w/ the sleds on display in Ptbo a few years ago. The Blizzard when it debuted looked like the only 'practical' offering for southern Ontario riders.

 

If the trails are groomed perfectly, what's the point of a 137 & it's ability to bridge moguls?

They (Brp) had a showing late this winter in North Bay at The Best Western on lakeshore. I thought about going but when i heard what models were going to be there i didn't waste my time. All backcountry,summits and one Xrs shorty. No 4 strokes?  

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32 minutes ago, snowchopper said:

They (Brp) had a showing late this winter in North Bay at The Best Western on lakeshore. I thought about going but when i heard what models were going to be there i didn't waste my time. All backcountry,summits and one Xrs shorty. No 4 strokes?  

 

I wonder what percentage of the XS chassis Blizzards were 900s?

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37 minutes ago, revrnd said:

 

I wonder what percentage of the XS chassis Blizzards were 900s?

Good question. It would be really interesting to see the break down in numbers on each model.And to see what is the most popular model for say Ontario.

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22 hours ago, revrnd said:

 

I wonder what percentage of the XS chassis Blizzards were 900s?

I'm curious about that as well...of all the XS Blizzards I've seen on the trails and parked at hotels the last 4 seasons (and that's a LOT), I can only recall a couple of 600 ETECs, and one 1200. All the rest were 900s.

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2 hours ago, irREVerent said:

I'm curious about that as well...of all the XS Blizzards I've seen on the trails and parked at hotels the last 4 seasons (and that's a LOT), I can only recall a couple of 600 ETECs, and one 1200. All the rest were 900s.

Mrs Iq turbo and myself, have noticed that also this season irREVerent.

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2 hours ago, irREVerent said:

I'm curious about that as well...of all the XS Blizzards I've seen on the trails and parked at hotels the last 4 seasons (and that's a LOT), I can only recall a couple of 600 ETECs, and one 1200. All the rest were 900s.

 

38 minutes ago, IQ TURBO said:

Mrs Iq turbo and myself, have noticed that also this season irREVerent.

 

Guys, we're not looking @ 'the big picture' by questioning why BRP would eliminate the 4S in the 129 sleds...

 

I don't mind the narrow Gen4, the wide version, not so much. It kind of looks like something CASE, Clark or Michigan would've come up w/ in the 70s if they had made snowmobiles.

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I was planning on ordering a 900 turbo, I was waiting until the sled show in Kanata, most of the sleds on the floor were deep powder trail shredders or green. What a joke.

I ended up buying another apex 2016 with 800 km, new doos have 4 year warranty but no good when in the middle of no where. No need for warranty with a pure bred yammie

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1 hour ago, revrnd said:

 

 

Guys, we're not looking @ 'the big picture' by questioning why BRP would eliminate the 4S in the 129 sleds...

 

I don't mind the narrow Gen4, the wide version, not so much. It kind of looks like something CASE, Clark or Michigan would've come up w/ in the 70s if they had made snowmobiles.

 

Comes down to your personal preference.  I prefer the wide body G4.  I think it looks more mean, has a more aggressive look to it.  It'd look better with me on a turbo, whipping past Nunz's 850 ....  ahem ... lol !!!

 

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55 minutes ago, Denis007 said:

 

Comes down to your personal preference.  I prefer the wide body G4.  I think it looks more mean, has a more aggressive look to it.  It'd look better with me on a turbo, whipping past Nunz's 850 ....  ahem ... lol !!!

 

Wait till you ride a "flashed" one next season. Just saying. Did I just let the cat outta the bag there or what?...:ph34r:

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2 hours ago, IQ TURBO said:

Wait till you ride a "flashed" one next season. Just saying. Did I just let the cat outta the bag there or what?...:ph34r:

a flashed one still wont run with the 1200 I have in the garage.....180-190 is not enough....fun factor is 270 and up...that's if its a 4stoker.

Still going to stick with the 850....have been thru a quite few motors with the 850 and no down time period thanks to my dealer and brp …

850 for next yr will have a hairdryer for me.

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