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Big Pussy

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Big Pussy last won the day on December 22 2021

Big Pussy had the most liked content!

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About Big Pussy

  • Birthday 03/08/1958

Profile Information

  • Location
    Woodstock
  • Main Riding Area
    Southern Ontario
  • Club
    Lake Conestogo
  • Sled
    2015 XF7000 LXR
  • Previous and/or Other Sleds
    1974 Lynx II 340<br /><br />
    1995 Wildcat Touring<br /><br />
    2001 Thundercat
  • 16/17 Mileage
    2000km
  • 15/16 Mileage
    1500km
  • 14/15 Mileage
    2450m
  • 13/14 Mileage
    2432m
  • 12/13 Mileage
    1600m
  • 11/12 Mileage
    1200m
  • 10/11 Mileage
    1200m
  • Interests
    20,000 Mile Club on my T-Cat.
  • Gender
    Male

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  1. My point is, if you havn't figured it out, it might be better to not put anything on that post. Sorry to hurt your feelings.
  2. When installed, is there enough space under the lock to get fingers under it ? If so a passer by could pry it up and break off the post rendering the sled useless ruining a trip. Think of what a screwdriver could do. Better sleep with one eye open.
  3. I guess it is east of hiway 19 so I think you are right.
  4. I have not had a problem yet in the trailer. I do have a 400 watt inverter that I used to put in the trailer along with the battery out of my stored car. The battery would charge from the truck on the road via the 7 pin trailer plug. That inverter would run 4 heater pads on two sleds no problem. My sled battery is the original 2015 and I will have to replace it once through this season. This is not much of a hardship at all. It just sounds like it. Not having to carry 5 liters of oil for a trip is the bonus. The sled is only plugged in at night if the temp is going real low. It will start ok with an 45 min plug in while getting breakfast.
  5. I am glad to see someone actually did it and had the same results as me. 3 sleds in our group with them. I get the idea everyone just laughs at the idea. Even when they have the problem are in denial. I laugh at the hair dryer ordeal that I see all the time. Convincing people is tough to do.
  6. 1049 cc triple 4 stroke Yamaha engine. There is no way it could be started with a rope wrapped around the clutch. The battery and the starter is just too small to crank that engine colder than -25c. Heating the block around the main bearing area with 1 or 2 50w Kats heating pads works wonders.
  7. One of the riding buddies cannot pull his 800 XRS fast enough to start when at -28c. He has to rip the hair dryer of the motel wall and doo the routine. Us 1049 guys just plug in our Kats pad heaters (50 watts each) the night before and turn the key in the morning. Wind up the extension cord and go. No need to dis-assemble the sled or rape the hair dryer.
  8. I tried a single carbides that had great turning ability but darted like hell. I tried the doollys that didn't dart but plugged up with gravel crossing the roads and would not bite and turn. I would see Cobra Heads on sleds and asked the riders how they liked them. Then one day on the long drive to work, it came to me. Use a thin 0.125" base plate to deepen and protect the skis all the way to the back from the gravel. Use a Woodys 6" executive that turned so good. Make the Cobra Head that worked like the old Polaris Easy Steer. Put it all together in one system that was easy to make. Shorten the rear of the bar to reduce the "Caster Lag" that makes the steering hard. Here is how to do it for those who can fabricate. Now that is using the head for more than a hat rack. When I think of all the money spent by people looking for some kind of steering utopia, I have to LMFAO. C&A Pro's, Mohawks, SLP's, Curves, Pilot this and Pilot that, Stryker, adjustable carbides. Shimming this and shimming that. Any new gimmick to lighten the wallet of the average Joe. The concept of steering in snow is not so hard. It was done in the horse and cutter days. The depth of the keel turns the sled in loose snow. The depth and shape of the host bar turns the sled in hard packed snow. The length and angle of the carbide inserts turn the sled on ice. The "Cobra Head" rides over the ridges just like your old wooded toboggan and smooths the surface for the host bar to cut a new groove. Those skis in the picture came on my 2001 Thundercat and had 24,980 miles on them when I sold the sled. They will last forever if properly protected.
  9. I made my own Cobra Heads using a stainless base plate to protect the plastic keel. Then 3/4 of a 6" Executive Woodys carbide with the back cut off behind the hard weld mounted through the base plate. And finally a stainless front spoon welded on and bolted to the curve of the ski. Zero darting ans all the bite of the single bar and deeper keel. Easier steering due to less bar at the back pulling the handlebars straight all on the factory old plastic Cat skis. Ran this design for years.
  10. My 1995 Wildcat 700 EFI did that trip no problem. There is something wrong if a new sled can't do it.
  11. With any luck the worm is steel and the worm wheel is brass and not plastic like the Saturn window regulator motor used on YamaCats. I never had a problem using the pull/push hand lever. I was also smart enough not to change direction while moving. Looks like the output of the actuator is a crank to pivot the bellcrank and operate a standard chaincase fork.
  12. Fire department to get out to a burning wind turbine ?
  13. He must be riding one or two OLD sleds now in Kap.
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