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Sksman

Single axle hybrid trailers reviews

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This was the result of missing front bolt and rough spring road into cottage. Had two sleds loaded.

Resized_20190515_163815.jpeg

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On 6/3/2019 at 8:40 PM, revrnd said:

YIKES!

 

I wonder if using teflon or nylatron sheet would be more durable? Is the Triton 'gasket' just rubber? 

Probably, my buddy replaced his with something similar to nylatron and grade 8 bolts. I used what Triton has as a kit, looks like a rubber product to me. Triton distributor seems more confident in this fix.

  Nunz keep an eye on yours, you travel a lot.

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7 hours ago, Blake G said:

I believe the Bullitt's floor channel is thinner than Triton's, and Superclamp's little hook thingy wouldn't fit.

 

I paid Action Trailer a few bucks to install 8 D rings in the floor, carefully positioned so I can be outside the trailer - - to strap down the front of one sled via the front access door, and the front of the second sled via the side door.

Strange - my hook thingy took a bit of aligning but eventually fastened tight with the correct hook orientation. I purchased the anchor strip for the rear superclamp as wasn't sure where each rear end would end up with two machines. Guess you could also use the regular bolt hook up through the floor - but you have already conquered the problem.

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On 6/4/2019 at 7:49 AM, Sksman said:

 

i was looking at the Bullet before.  It’s amazing the price difference between Bullet, SnoPro and Triton.  I guess different aluminum panels?

 

It looks like the Bullit is constructed in two phases - the base 7 X 16 trailer - upon which the top  superstructure has later been mounted. (results in exposed floor at the leading edge) One base size  trailer can be used for several model applications at the factory. According to spec sheets, material thicknesses etc. are similar. The Bullit has more supporting material than the TC167, if you check out the interior and fender mountings up close. Accessories which are included in the Bullit are going to put the price of the TC167 over $10,000. before tax.

 

I am thinking, much like Toyota for instance, that you are also paying extra for the legend of reliability. After 6 years of ownership of a 2009 Tacoma that did not have one minute of ownership without something being wrong with it (actually came out ahead on an extended warranty bought at a discount in the U.S. and same for a 2008 Corolla*) pay little heed to marketing BS and do as much inspection and research as I can myself.

 

*2004 Echo continues to run flawlessly and even fixes itself sometimes.

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Doing a bit of work on the Bullit trailer yesterday - after above discussion on metal rot between trailer and axle on Triton, decided to take a closer look. Posting pics of the axle / frame junction for the Bullit - looks very servicable.

381449434_IMG_3951(Medium).thumb.JPG.529df06842a0f6ad6166fc19473e9128.JPG

 

Good  thick piece of nylon looking fiber between the axle and frame mount. The way the mount to frame is constructed, it is easy to check the condition of the area in relation to aluminum or steel degrading. On my Triton, the mount is made on a long channel of aluminum sistered to the main frame - the only way to tell if corrosion is evident for sure is to remove the axle to inspect. Pretty good idea here.....easy to check the anchoring bolts.

 

1667301229_IMG_3954(Medium).thumb.JPG.aebccd8fc91e5796b1d4d444805d5374.JPG

 

A couple of ideas to pass along.....it you don't like rusty safety chains, get yea to Canadian Tire and pick up a couple of bicycle inner tubes - make sure they are the flat resistant product - says right on them. The flat resistant are thicker rubber, are cold resistant as opposed to regular thickness and work great. Slide the rubber over your chain after removal and then refasten. I have had these installed for a couple of years - the ends of the chain rust a bit, but the rest of the chain is protected. A bit of Corrosion Free undercoating - the best on the market - adds protection and the inner tube keeps it from thinner during bad weather. (4 pin wiring is to hook up to battery to check trailer wiring)

 

194489888_IMG_3955(Medium).thumb.JPG.32066a8d27bd8f7aa21c50d2ddcf2e9d.JPG

 

 A couple of years ago, used a few around the home items to make a cheap cover for the 7 pin connector - usually the first thing to start rotting when salt is evident.

 

2123269859_IMG_3956(Medium).thumb.JPG.66ccc91334f4729ece714aa00c2e9558.JPG

 

And finally, a pic for Blake - the Superclamp hook - not sure why yours would not work

 

1935677086_IMG_3962(Medium).thumb.JPG.af152058fa3313a09e1255b96cefa4e2.JPG

 

Maybe check the model number of the hook? - 2200 T style Deck Hook - SKU for RD - 12-34400-02 Sometimes available at Canadian Tire or Princess Auto on sale.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, slomo said:

And finally, a pic for Blake - the Superclamp hook - not sure why yours would not work

 

1935677086_IMG_3962(Medium).thumb.JPG.af152058fa3313a09e1255b96cefa4e2.JPG

 

Maybe check the model number of the hook? - 2200 T style Deck Hook - SKU for RD - 12-34400-02 Sometimes available at Canadian Tire or Princess Auto on sale.

Thank you, slomo.

 

I'll put a man on it!

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9 hours ago, slomo said:

Doing a bit of work on the Bullit trailer yesterday - after above discussion on metal rot between trailer and axle on Triton, decided to take a closer look. Posting pics of the axle / frame junction for the Bullit - looks very servicable.

381449434_IMG_3951(Medium).thumb.JPG.529df06842a0f6ad6166fc19473e9128.JPG

 

Good  thick piece of nylon looking fiber between the axle and frame mount. The way the mount to frame is constructed, it is easy to check the condition of the area in relation to aluminum or steel degrading. On my Triton, the mount is made on a long channel of aluminum sistered to the main frame - the only way to tell if corrosion is evident for sure is to remove the axle to inspect. Pretty good idea here.....easy to check the anchoring bolts.

 

1667301229_IMG_3954(Medium).thumb.JPG.aebccd8fc91e5796b1d4d444805d5374.JPG

 

A couple of ideas to pass along.....it you don't like rusty safety chains, get yea to Canadian Tire and pick up a couple of bicycle inner tubes - make sure they are the flat resistant product - says right on them. The flat resistant are thicker rubber, are cold resistant as opposed to regular thickness and work great. Slide the rubber over your chain after removal and then refasten. I have had these installed for a couple of years - the ends of the chain rust a bit, but the rest of the chain is protected. A bit of Corrosion Free undercoating - the best on the market - adds protection and the inner tube keeps it from thinner during bad weather. (4 pin wiring is to hook up to battery to check trailer wiring)

 

194489888_IMG_3955(Medium).thumb.JPG.32066a8d27bd8f7aa21c50d2ddcf2e9d.JPG

 

 A couple of years ago, used a few around the home items to make a cheap cover for the 7 pin connector - usually the first thing to start rotting when salt is evident.

 

2123269859_IMG_3956(Medium).thumb.JPG.66ccc91334f4729ece714aa00c2e9558.JPG

 

And finally, a pic for Blake - the Superclamp hook - not sure why yours would not work

 

1935677086_IMG_3962(Medium).thumb.JPG.af152058fa3313a09e1255b96cefa4e2.JPG

 

Maybe check the model number of the hook? - 2200 T style Deck Hook - SKU for RD - 12-34400-02 Sometimes available at Canadian Tire or Princess Auto on sale.

 

 

 

 

 

Wow, Slomo you are one .....uh...... thorough dude.

 

I've had an aluminum enclosed trailer for 10 years now and I don't think I've ever looked underneath it......lol

 

I was thinking maybe I should change out the tires this fall since I've only ever changed one due to a blow out. That was 6-7 years ago.

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15 hours ago, Blackstar said:

 

Wow, Slomo you are one .....uh...... thorough dude.

 

I've had an aluminum enclosed trailer for 10 years now and I don't think I've ever looked underneath it......lol

 

 

Not too hard to do........I have the trailer resting on its frame while I use it as a work space for my new to me snowmobile....and passing on some observations. I have it on good authority that Triton was interested in how this trailer compared to their similar offering. I have to say, appreciated some of the comments in this thread that are based on fact or evidence - as opposed to those channeling their inner Craig Nicholson - particularly the dangers of aluminum and ferrous metal contact. Not sure how PLC's idea of a sacrificial anode would work as I think the anode has to be immersed in water to work, but good thinking nevertheless. 

 

Might help out someone like myself who does not go into debt for toys (unless 0% interest rate or similar) and wants to save 3 - 4 thousand dollars.

 

 

 

 

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The aluminum weld quality leaves a lot to be desired.  Looks like it was made with a spool gun and not a Fronius CMT welding system.  Maybe the weld will break before the channel corrodes through.

 

One of the mounting brackets on my Toy Carrier axle (same axle as used on Triton) broke beside the weld at bracket to axle joint in the heat affected zone.  This caused more sway than normal and if left unchecked, would result in an axle leaving the trailer.  It was welded and got through the winter.  Needs checking again.   The moral of the story is to do a good summer check over to avoid the tears on the side of the road and ride home on a flat bed.

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10 hours ago, Big Pussy said:

The aluminum weld quality leaves a lot to be desired.  Looks like it was made with a spool gun and not a Fronius CMT welding system.  Maybe the weld will break before the channel corrodes through.

 

One of the mounting brackets on my Toy Carrier axle (same axle as used on Triton) broke beside the weld at bracket to axle joint in the heat affected zone.  This caused more sway than normal and if left unchecked, would result in an axle leaving the trailer.  It was welded and got through the winter.  Needs checking again.   The moral of the story is to do a good summer check over to avoid the tears on the side of the road and ride home on a flat bed.

 

Good explanation of that process and some applications here for those curious types:

 

https://www.wileymetal.com/what-is-cold-metal-transfer-and-is-it-more-efficient-than-mig/

 

Out of curiousity, I am going to look at that area further to see if the structure could be improved by physical joint - an ounce of prevention etc. Be looking at my Triton more closely as well.

 

 

 

 

Edited by slomo

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Enjoying this thread. Lots of good info on the trailers.Thanks Slomo for posting things that you did or did not like on your trailer and posting how you made little changes to make it your own.This info hopefully will help people make a better informed decision when purchasing a new trailer. And like BP said "do a good summer check over to avoid frustration when you are needing your trailer".Keep the good tips coming.:) 

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Picked up a 2 year old 8x12’ Mission trailer at the end of the season. Towed well empty but much more wind drag than my old 8x10’ clam shell Triton. 

I like this modification the previous owner made to prevent the skis hitting the door frame. 

B6039EE6-C33F-4C46-A190-D109E21A3147.jpeg

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16 hours ago, yamadan700 said:

Picked up a 2 year old 8x12’ Mission trailer at the end of the season. Towed well empty but much more wind drag than my old 8x10’ clam shell Triton. 

I like this modification the previous owner made to prevent the skis hitting the door frame. 

B6039EE6-C33F-4C46-A190-D109E21A3147.jpeg

Good idea on saving the sides of your trailer. Just a thought.You could also use those pockets to hold extra bottles of oil, spare drive belt,spare skags,sliders or tie down straps..Just my 02 cents..

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