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Sksman

Single axle hybrid trailers reviews

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I am looking at purchasing an enclosed single trailer and read in an old thread that a number of guys bought 7’ wide hybrids last year and would like to hear reviews on experience.  

 

Leaning towards a 7’ wide as majority of the time I believe I will be trailering one sled only.

 

How do the single axle hybrid such as TC167 or Bullet tow?  

Better mileage then a traditional 101” wide hybrid?

 

Does the single axle with 2 machine create extra tounge weight?

 

Is loading 2 machines in 7{ wide hybrid a pain in the ass?

 

Is one 3,500lbs single axle better then 2 axles at 2,200lbs each?

 

Should I just go and get a 14ft with 5’ V nose trailer?

 

 

Towing with a 2017 Dodge Ram with 5.7 hemi.

 

My primary sled is a 2019 Polaris Titan.  Big and wide track.

Second sled is a 2003 Polaris SKS 700.

 

 

 

 

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All I can offer is second hand information, but a number of my friends have moved to the TC-167 and similar trailers. 

 

The narrower trailers seem to tow easier as they tuck into the truck's windstream.  The added advantage is that the visibility down the side of a 7 foot trailer is much better that the 101" wide.  Loading seems to be very easy as well, as the sleds are driven straight in but park in a staggered configuration. 

 

I am sure that irREVerent, Nunz, and many others could weigh in with more first hand experiences.

 

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I previously had a 7’ wide Triton that was 18 long plus the v.  I liked it but at that point we used only for ATVs.  I had taken a little hiatus from snowmobiling other then shorter cottage trips and ice fishing.   I sold it about 5 years ago and wish I had kept it now.  But it was a little big for one sled.  

 

And does the dealers give good October discounts at the sled show?  Or better buying now?

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I have a tc167 for years now. Previously had the 101 11 ft triton clam shell 

  167 Is a slightly tougher pull, use more gas and side winds are felt more so than the 101.

  Drop down door is the best thing going.

 No worries about snow weighing down a clam shell. 

  Loading is much easier imo. Lots of room for gear in a 167. You can load 3 sleds if needed, very tight and tricky but a buddy does it all the time.

  Single axle works fine for me, suggest brakes as I warped my rotors quick on my Ford 150.

 Personally I'd go with the tc167.

  Caveat....watch the front axle bolts!!!!

Check also the spacer between frame and axle, mine disintegrated.

  3 riding buddies had front bolts break away...we trailer a lot.

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I purchased the 16' X 7" Bullit about a month and a half ago - the purchase price was very similar to the show price. To date I have towed it to my place from Action Trailers unladen so can't comment on loaded weight performance yet. But it did tow very well empty and visibility around the sides was good so that passing slower vehicles did not present much of a problem. It was a very windy day on which I picked it up, yet felt no sway or much wind resistance.

 

I am glad I got it earlier than next fall to allow for a few improvements and modifications. I am installing more interior lighting, (there is one at the front part already) storage rigging for fuel cans etc, and adaptations for Super Clamp tie downs - the hooks for floor channels are readily available. Have also installed some sliding hasp lock hardware on the front and side doors. A wireless rear view camera is also in the works as is an access port to be able to run an extension cord for an interior heater if block heater electrical is available.

 

A few deficiencies:

-the leading edge of the trailer exposes the edge of the pressure treated plywood floor platform, which after exposure to salt and slush, will likely degrade. Will be fixing this with an application of painted Grace Ice and Water Shield - very tough and sticky roofing membrane.

-in order to grease the ezee lube bearings (or whatever brand name they are) the entire wheel has to be removed to take off plastic decorative wheel hub covers which are virtually useless anyway and this operation will be a disincentive to regular hub bearing greasing. The plastic hub covers have been turned into deco pieces for ms. slomo's flower garden - the hub can now be greased without having to remove a wheel. 

-one wheel was torqued more than the other. User manual supplies proper torque measurements for hub nuts - neither wheel to spec.

-corrogated metal on roof is going to provide a space for water to settle over time - expansion and contraction during weather might create leaking - will jump off that bridge when I get to it, but likely a layer of ice and water shield will make an easy repair.

 

364549778_IMG_3932(Medium).JPG.4156fdc5d29afa16d1827f40833d4538.JPG

-grease fittings on the ramp door closing handles were sunk too deep into the hinge metal and could not be accessed by a regular grease gun. They appear to be some sort of press fit without threads on them so will be drilled out and replaced.

-some wiring to exterior lights was too tight into unprotected access holes in sharp metal with little insulating material on the wiring - a condition that would result in the wiring contracting in cold weather, being cut into by the metal by vibration and shorting out - something you don't want at -30 or -40 degrees. Wiring has been relaxed with extra length and protection added to the harness.

 

2015275652_IMG_3926(Medium).JPG.7e61efb2a58050021a6d38dcc07fc29b.JPG

 

For the money though I am pretty pleased - the axles and hubs are brand names, trailer structure is well constructed, ferrous metal has been well insulated from aluminum and the opening side door, which will come in handy,  is an extra cost feature on the similar Triton model. I have been, however, paying closer attention to ms. slomo's yoga stuff, as if you spend much time in the trailer working on it or a sled, your back will pay the price and need to be stretched and relaxed. Only thing holding me back on the yoga thing is the price and look of the yoga outfits you need to buy and sledding costs enough already.

 

My dealing with Action Trailers could have been better - the trailer was ready on time, but the guy who was supposed to install the license plate disappeared without attaching it - so ran all day without one. Received an email saying I left 'before they could put it on' - I assumed that the guy would have done his job and that it was on there. (the license plate attaching area is well out of sight - hope this doesn't present any difficulties later) Anywhoo, they had to be reminded to courier it to me which eventually happened - not a big deal on the surface, but I did pay close to $100 to get plated and registered.

 

Anything else I note will be mentioned here later.

 

 

 

Edited by slomo
side door is extra cost option on Triton, not front door
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Great review Slomo!

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Quote

My dealing with Action Trailers could have been better - the trailer was ready on time, but the guy who was supposed to install the license plate disappeared without attaching it - so ran all day without one. Received an email saying I left 'before they could put it on' - I assumed that the guy would have done his job and that it was on there. (the license plate attaching area is well out of sight - hope this doesn't present any difficulties later) Anywhoo, they had to be reminded to courier it to me which eventually happened - not a big deal on the surface, but I did pay close to $100 to get plated and registered.

Action Trailers is a "one and done" type of place.   I have bought a couple of trailers and tolerated the sales process because they had what I wanted and were priced fairly.   Service/parts on the other hand IS A JOKE.   Just hope you never need to take it back or need to order parts from them.   I had parts ordered for my Neo trailer for over a year.   They finally called to say that they had them so I drove 1.5 hours each way to go pick them up and the guy cant find them!!!   About an hour away on my way home, the guy calls and said I found your part but we close in 15 mins and I wont leave them behind the shop or anything for you.   What a sh-t show.  

 

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On 6/2/2019 at 8:46 AM, Sksman said:

I am looking at purchasing an enclosed single trailer and read in an old thread that a number of guys bought 7’ wide hybrids last year and would like to hear reviews on experience.  

 

Leaning towards a 7’ wide as majority of the time I believe I will be trailering one sled only.

 

How do the single axle hybrid such as TC167 or Bullet tow?  

Better mileage then a traditional 101” wide hybrid?

 

Does the single axle with 2 machine create extra tounge weight?

 

Is loading 2 machines in 7{ wide hybrid a pain in the ass?

 

Is one 3,500lbs single axle better then 2 axles at 2,200lbs each?

 

Should I just go and get a 14ft with 5’ V nose trailer?

 

 

Towing with a 2017 Dodge Ram with 5.7 hemi.

 

My primary sled is a 2019 Polaris Titan.  Big and wide track.

Second sled is a 2003 Polaris SKS 700.

 

 

 

 

 

On 6/2/2019 at 9:16 AM, sledjunk said:

All I can offer is second hand information, but a number of my friends have moved to the TC-167 and similar trailers. 

 

The narrower trailers seem to tow easier as they tuck into the truck's windstream.  The added advantage is that the visibility down the side of a 7 foot trailer is much better that the 101" wide.  Loading seems to be very easy as well, as the sleds are driven straight in but park in a staggered configuration. 

 

I am sure that irREVerent, Nunz, and many others could weigh in with more first hand experiences.

 

 

Winter of 2018, irREVerent hauled my sled along w/ his in his TC-167 to Timmins & I don't recall any loading issues. This was the 1st time I had loaded my sled in an enclosed trailer.

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23 hours ago, JohnnyB said:

I have a tc167 for years now. Previously had the 101 11 ft triton clam shell 

  167 Is a slightly tougher pull, use more gas and side winds are felt more so than the 101.

  Drop down door is the best thing going.

 No worries about snow weighing down a clam shell. 

  Loading is much easier imo. Lots of room for gear in a 167. You can load 3 sleds if needed, very tight and tricky but a buddy does it all the time.

  Single axle works fine for me, suggest brakes as I warped my rotors quick on my Ford 150.

 Personally I'd go with the tc167.

  Caveat....watch the front axle bolts!!!!

Check also the spacer between frame and axle, mine disintegrated.

  3 riding buddies had front bolts break away...we trailer a lot.

 

What is the spacer made off? Is it the result of galvanic reaction?

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6 hours ago, revrnd said:

 

What is the spacer made off? Is it the result of galvanic reaction?

Triton used some sort of thin fibourous material. My 2012 was completely gone. A buddies 2016 was starting to come apart. Triton now uses a rubber type of gasket to separate the two metals. My trailer got thinned out pretty bad, paper thin. I have the fix on order through triton, they bolt up another piece u shape aluminum over the affected area

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Pic of the gasket from my buddies 2016

IMG_1878.jpg

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My trailer, new axle. You can see the new gasket to the right

Resized_20190515_153717.jpeg

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Is that frame rotted out?  2012 Triton?

 

After Solmo review I was thinking pay more for Triton.   Now maybe not so much.

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The primary advantage of the Bullitt over the TC167, is the much reduced wind resistance. Otherwise, pretty hard to match Triton quality.

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3 hours ago, JohnnyB said:

My trailer, new axle. You can see the new gasket to the right

Resized_20190515_153717.jpeg

YIKES!

 

I wonder if using teflon or nylatron sheet would be more durable? Is the Triton 'gasket' just rubber? 

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12 hours ago, Sksman said:

Is that frame rotted out?  2012 Triton?

 

After Solmo review I was thinking pay more for Triton.   Now maybe not so much.

 

12 hours ago, Blake G said:

The primary advantage of the Bullitt over the TC167, is the much reduced wind resistance. Otherwise, pretty hard to match Triton quality.

The items I mention above are little quirks that in my opinion needed to be addressed to reduce problems in the future, but don't get the idea that the Bullit is not good value for the money - about $3,000.00 less than the Triton. Structurally the Bullit is very sound, all welds look good, brand name components are used in hitch, axle, and hubs, (sorry don't have the manuals at hand)  I have rarely bought anything including a $50K truck that didn't need some kind of 'improvements' right from the factory. My single Triton trailer needed some upgrades and you were nickled and dimed for any extras. Both are good products and worth of consideration depending on your usage.

 

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47 minutes ago, slomo said:

 

The items I mention above are little quirks that in my opinion needed to be addressed to reduce problems in the future, but don't get the idea that the Bullit is not good value for the money - about $3,000.00 less than the Triton. Structurally the Bullit is very sound, all welds look good, brand name components are used in hitch, axle, and hubs, (sorry don't have the manuals at hand)  I have rarely bought anything including a $50K truck that didn't need some kind of 'improvements' right from the factory. My single Triton trailer needed some upgrades and you were nickled and dimed for any extras. Both are good products and worth of consideration depending on your usage.

 

Thank you for input.  It is greatly appreciated.

 

i was looking at the Bullet before.  It’s amazing the price difference between Bullet, SnoPro and Triton.  I guess different aluminum panels?

 

 

 

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48 minutes ago, Sksman said:

Thank you for input.  It is greatly appreciated.

 

i was looking at the Bullet before.  It’s amazing the price difference between Bullet, SnoPro and Triton.  I guess different aluminum panels?

 

 

 

I think it will depend where the trailer is manufactured.

With trump and his tariffs anything out of the US will be more.

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14 hours ago, revrnd said:

I wonder if using teflon or nylatron sheet would be more durable? 

In addition to the sheet, you may want to consider TEF GEL  (www.tefgel.com/contain.php?param=tefgel_infor) It's what the aircraft and boat industry often use on dissimilar metals. Downside is that it is expensive but so is a rotted frame.

I wonder if a Sacrificial Anode  (like that used on boats and boat motors) attached to the frame near the axle mounts would work?

 

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Sorry, little late to reply to this, we had a Triton TC118 for a couple of years and had been towing it with a Ford Escape then Jeep Grand Cherokee and found that even with clip on Mirror extenders it was almost impossible to see around the trailer and that it seemed to catch a lot of wind. Last spring we sold it and bought a Triton TC 167 and after using it quite extensively to trips to northern Ontario and Quebec in my opinion it is one of the best trailers out there. Easy to load and put extra gear in with the side door. We found with the TC 118 that had the hatch at the front of the trailer there was almost always drips on the sleds whenever we got there. I have installed a Superclamp attachment for the sled that goes to the front and just use the Triton tie down system for the second sled, I may pick up another Superclamp this year at the sled show in October. We also use it when we take out atv's out and the trailer hold both albeit with not much room to spare lengthwise. I had a small issue with the side door hinges getting tight about a week ago but sprayed them with WD 40 and all good again. Hope this helps a bit. I strongly recommend the Triton trailers although more expensive I do think you get what you pay for and the resale value of them is quite good.

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1 hour ago, Nunz said:

Sorry, little late to reply to this, we had a Triton TC118 for a couple of years and had been towing it with a Ford Escape then Jeep Grand Cherokee and found that even with clip on Mirror extenders it was almost impossible to see around the trailer and that it seemed to catch a lot of wind. Last spring we sold it and bought a Triton TC 167 and after using it quite extensively to trips to northern Ontario and Quebec in my opinion it is one of the best trailers out there. Easy to load and put extra gear in with the side door. We found with the TC 118 that had the hatch at the front of the trailer there was almost always drips on the sleds whenever we got there. I have installed a Superclamp attachment for the sled that goes to the front and just use the Triton tie down system for the second sled, I may pick up another Superclamp this year at the sled show in October. We also use it when we take out atv's out and the trailer hold both albeit with not much room to spare lengthwise. I had a small issue with the side door hinges getting tight about a week ago but sprayed them with WD 40 and all good again. Hope this helps a bit. I strongly recommend the Triton trailers although more expensive I do think you get what you pay for and the resale value of them is quite good.

 

 

 

No doubting the Triton is a fine trailer, not disagreeing with your or any other appraisal, but folks might want to keep in mind that at the time everyone else purchased the TC167 (and I looked at one myself) there was little or no competition in this particular market niche - not until probably this year with the Bullit and perhaps another brand name. Triton might have the reputation, but other brands might be trying to get into the field with similar offerings - and a discounted price. Worth a look around.

 

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Nunz: I might have something you can buy. I bought a superclamp plus one or two extra things (something to hold the rear of sled maybe?), but ended up reselling my Triton before using the superclamp stuff.

 

Slomo: the Superclamp stuff doesn't seem to fit in the tracking of my Bullitt.

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12 hours ago, Blake G said:

 

 

Slomo: the Superclamp stuff doesn't seem to fit in the tracking of my Bullitt.

Would you be having trouble with the self locking bolt hook that fits in the aluminum floor channel, the strip hook anchor which bolts to the floor, or the alignment of the skis in relation to the Super Clamp arms once the sleds are loaded?

 

hook.jpg.ab48661762f8cad1a88609390eb6bab6.jpg

 

hook2.jpg.985ec9d3f1020d1be37fdfc0fce00ad5.jpg

 

 

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I believe the Bullitt's floor channel is thinner than Triton's, and Superclamp's little hook thingy wouldn't fit.

 

I paid Action Trailer a few bucks to install 8 D rings in the floor, carefully positioned so I can be outside the trailer - - to strap down the front of one sled via the front access door, and the front of the second sled via the side door.

Edited by Blake G

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On 6/3/2019 at 7:36 PM, Sksman said:

Is that frame rotted out?  2012 Triton?

 

After Solmo review I was thinking pay more for Triton.   Now maybe not so 

Because the gasket separating steel from aluminium had disintegrated the aluminum started to rust out. The hole was due to the front bolts breaking off causing the axle to bend up and into trailer frame where the remaining bolt is located. I was aware of this potential issue and checked frequently. Funny thing is when you check it all out gasket appeared ok but what you see is just the leading edge. Everything between was completely gone.

  I have no issue with Triton, love the trailer and this Tc167.

  This unit likely has more km than most of you together. 2 trips to Wyoming, NB three times, Nova Scotia, Quebec at least 20 trips plus I'd guess over 100 Ontario trips short and long.

   Still has original axle and bearings and wiring. Updated to led lights is all.

  Also used it for work and loaned out for a few moves.

  Worth the extra $ from my point of view.

  I would change axle bolts and check on gasket condition every couple years.

 

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